6 morning sickness remedies to try

Do ginger, acupuncture and vitamins work as morning sickness remedies? Midwife Katie answers the most common questions about relieving pregnancy nausea.

BABYBJÖRN Magazine –
Ginger and vitamin B are popular morning sickness remedies.
Photo: Johnér

What are the best remedies for morning sickness?

Many women find keeping something like a digestive biscuit next to their bed useful. Eat one of these and have a drink before attempting to get out of bed. This will often settle the stomach. Eat meals little and often and avoid greasy, high fat or salty foods. Some women also find cold meals are easier digest that a warm meal. Get plenty of rest and consider keeping a diary to identify potential triggers.

Read more! “When does morning sickness start?” and other questions about nausea.

Does vitamin B6 work for morning sickness?

While B-Complex vitamins won’t necessarily cure morning sickness, researchers have found that increasing the amount of vitamin B in the diets of expecting mothers does help provide some relief from morning sickness. Usually a vitamin B supplement is recommended by doctors before they prescribe or recommend any medications.

Does ginger help morning sickness?

Ginger has always been used as a herbal treatment for upset stomachs and nausea. It is best to use fresh ginger. While ginger is considered safe, some people feel its consumption should be limited during pregnancy, so it is best to ask your midwife before taking it.

Do sea bands help morning sickness?

Sea bands take advantage of the acupressure point beneath our wrists, which helps relieve nausea and vomiting. The sea bands work by applying pressure to the P6 pressure point consistently throughout the day to help relieve your morning sickness symptoms.

Also read! Pregnancy diet: what to eat when pregnant

Will acupuncture cure morning sickness?

While acupuncture isn’t a common remedy for morning sickness, a Swedish study showed that 90% of women felt less nauseous after receiving acupuncture treatments for their morning sickness.

What can I do if certain odours are making me sick?

Many women find that certain scents or odours will make them feel nauseous. If this is the case then carry around a handkerchief with your favourite smell; this could be a perfume or a couple of drops of an essential oil (people find lemon, wild orange or peppermint useful). When you feel your stomach turning, take out the handkerchief and have a sniff.

Katie Hilton on morning sickness

Katie Hilton

Works as: A midwife, health visitor, parenting expert, writer. “My work couldn’t be better, I absolutely love working with families and supporting them throughout one of the most exciting transitions in their life!”

Family: Husband Richard, Benjamin who is 6, a chocolate Labrador called Buttons and our guinea pigs Fred and Oscar. Our house is like a zoo

Interests: Family obviously, we also love travelling and experiencing new cultures, cooking and reading.